June 22, 2018

Andrea Braga, Hayley O "Grady, and Turgay Dabak Contribute to Advanced Rainwater Harvesting Article for the Journal Water

Caption: (L-R) Andrea  Braga, Turgay Dabak, and Hayley O "Grady Caption: (L-R) Andrea Braga, Turgay Dabak, and Hayley O "Grady

A​ndrea Braga, P.E. , CPESC (Massachusetts); Hayley O'Grady, and Turgay Dabak, Ph.D., P.E. (Washington, D.C.), co-authored an article entitled "Performance of Two Advanced Rainwater Harvesting Systems in Washington D.C." published in the journal Water, Volume 10, Issue 5, on May 22, 2018.

Their coauthor was Cecilia Lane of the Government of the District of Columbia Department of Energy & Environment (DOEE). This paper is the culmination of an eight-year partnership between Geosyntec and the DOEE, which started with the design and construction of the systems in 2010.

Andrea is a Principal Water Resources Engineer based in Massachusetts with more than 12 years of professional experience helping clients develop innovative solutions to their complex water quality, flooding, and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance issues. She specializes in stormwater system design, modeling, and analysis from project planning and permitting to whole life-cycle costing, construction oversight, monitoring, and maintenance.

Turgay is a Principal Water Resources Engineer based in Washington, D.C. with more than 30 years of professional experience specializing in civil and environmental engineering, stormwater management, flood hazard identification and mitigation, dam safety, environmental assessments, expert testimony, and program management.

Hayley is a water resources consultant, specializing in erosion and sediment control and data analysis. She has experience in the oil and gas industry, specifically with environmental metrics and reporting. Hayley also has experience in renewable energy, including the manufacturing process of biodiesel fuel.

The paper focuses on the issues with combined sewer overflows (CSOs), which are a concern for many cities managing stormwater through combined sewer systems such as in the District of Columbia. The authors describe an innovative approach that uses an advanced rainwater harvesting (ARH) system to manage stormwater that has the potential to minimize CSOs and maximize water conservation. The ARH systems use OptiRTC's continuous monitoring and adaptive control (CMAC) technology to store or release water from a rainwater harvesting cistern. The study described in the paper assessed the efficacy of ARH systems to mitigate wet weather discharges at two firehouses in Washington, D.C. Data collected over a period of three years indicate that the systems were effective at mitigating wet weather discharges, with average event harvesting rates of more than 95%.

These results suggest that if implemented on a larger scale, ARH systems would be a valuable tool in effectively managing stormwater. Results also show that ARH systems are ideal for distributed use in urban areas where space is constrained and where infiltration to the subsurface may not be possible or desired, such as where there are contaminated subsoils.

Water is a peer-reviewed open access journal on water science and technology, including the ecology and management of water resources, and is published monthly online by MDPI.

Abstract

Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are a concern for many cities managing stormwater through combined sewer systems, including the District of Columbia (DC). Advanced rainwater harvesting (ARH) is an innovative approach to managing stormwater and has the potential to minimize CSOs and maximize water conservation. ARH systems use continuous monitoring and adaptive control (CMAC) technology to store or release water from a rainwater harvesting cistern. This study assessed the efficacy of ARH systems to mitigate wet weather discharges at two firehouses in DC. Continuous monitoring data was collected over a period of three years for the systems that were installed in 2012. The collected data indicates that the systems were effective at mitigating wet weather discharges, with average event harvesting rates greater than 95%. These results suggest that if implemented on a larger scale, ARH systems would be a valuable tool in effectively managing stormwater.

More Information

Learn more about the article: http://www.mdpi.com/2073-4441/10/5/667.
For consultation regarding about advanced rainwater harvesting, please contact Andrea Braga at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Hayley O "Grady at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or Turgay Dabak at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Learn more about Andrea at: https://www.geosyntec.com/people/andrea-braga
Learn more about Hayley at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hayley-o-grady-eit-cpesc-it-b06b4657/
Learn more about Turgay at: https://www.geosyntec.com/people/turgay-dabak

Geosyntec Consultants
Geosyntec is a specialized consulting and engineering firm that works with private and public sector clients to address new ventures and complex problems involving our environment, natural resources, and civil infrastructure.

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