August 3, 2017

Man Zhang Published in Environmental Pollution

Man Zhang (Minnesota) co-authored a paper entitled "In-situ degradation of soil-sorbed 17β-estradiol using carboxymethyl cellulose stabilized manganese oxide nanoparticles: Column studies" that was published in the journal Environmental Pollution in Volume 223 on pages 238-246 in April of 2017.

The study is the first of its kind on in-situ remediation of 17β-estradiol -contaminated soil in a column setting. The work tested a new remediation technology for in-situ degradation of estrogens by delivering a new class of stabilized manganese oxide (MnO2) nanoparticles in contaminated natural soils. While non-stabilized MnO2 particles rapidly aggregated and were not transportable through a soil column, the nanoparticles prepared using a food-grade carboxymethyl cellulose as a stabilizer remained fully dispersed in water and were soil deliverable. This nanoparticles-based technology appears promising for in-situ oxidation of endocrine disruptors in groundwater.

Man Zhang's co-authors were Bing Han and Don Zhao.

Environmental Pollution is an international journal that seeks to publish papers that report results from original, novel research that addresses significant environmental pollution issues and problems and contribute new knowledge to science.

Abstract

This work tested a new remediation technology for in-situ degradation of estrogens by delivering a new class of stabilized manganese oxide (MnO2) nanoparticles in contaminated soils. The nanoparticles were prepared using a food-grade carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as a stabilizer, which was able to facilitate particle delivery into soil. The effectiveness of the technology was tested using 17β-estradiol (E2) as a model estrogen and three sandy loams (SL1, SL2, and SL3) as model soils. Column transport tests showed that the nanoparticles can be delivered in the three soils, though retention of the nanoparticles varied. The nanoparticle retention is strongly dependent on the injection pore velocity. The treatment effectiveness is highly dependent upon the mass transfer rates of both the nanoparticles and contaminants. When the E2-laden soils were treated with 22–130 pore volumes of a 0.174 g/L MnO2 nanoparticle suspension, up to 88% of water leachable E2 was degraded. The nanoparticles were more effective for soils that offer moderate desorption rates of E2. Decreasing injection velocity or increasing MnO2 concentration facilitate E2 degradation. The nanoparticles-based technology appears promising for in-situ oxidation of endocrine disruptors in groundwater.

More Information

For more information regarding the publication, visit: Environmental Pollution
For more information on In-situ degradation, contact Man Zhang at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
To learn more about Man see her profile at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/man-zhang-6799232b/

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