Methodology for Determining Laboratory and In Situ Hydraulic Conductivity of Asphalt Permeable Friction Course
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The permeable friction course (PFC) is a layer of porous asphalt pavement overlain on conventional impervious hot-mix asphalt or portland cement concrete.

The drainage properties of PFC are typically considered to be governed primarily by two hydraulic properties: hydraulic conductivity and porosity. Both of these hydraulic properties change over the life cycle of the PFC layer due to clogging of the pore space by sediment. Therefore, determination of the hydraulic conductivity and porosity of PFC can be problematic. Laboratory and particularly field tests are necessary for accurately determining the hydraulic conductivity of the PFC layer. Taking multiple measurements over the life of the pavement shows how these hydraulic characteristics change with time and the varying roadway conditions at which they are evaluated. Constant head laboratory testing has shown that PFC experiences a nonlinear flow relationship as described by the Forchheimer equation. In addition to the laboratory analysis of the hydraulic characteristics, a falling head field test is recommended to determine the in situ hydraulic conductivity. This incorporates the modeling techniques used in the laboratory testing and applies them to the falling head conditions used in the field. The result is a nondestructive test procedure for determining the in situ hydraulic conductivity which is necessary for estimating the extent to which the benefits associated with the drainage characteristics of the PFC layer will persist. Read More:http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/(ASCE)HY.1943-7900.0000252

Publication Summary

  • Geosyntec Authors: Brandon Klenzendorf
  • All Authors: Randall J. Charbeneau, Brandon Klenzendorf, M. Barrett
  • Title: Methodology for Determining Laboratory and In Situ Hydraulic Conductivity of Asphalt Permeable Friction Course
  • Event or Publication: ASCE Journal of Hydraulic Engineering
  • Practice Areas: Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering
  • Date: 2010